Richard Beach–October 12, 2014 – “Affordances of Digital Tool Use”

Dr. Richard Beach


University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, USA

“How Affordances of Digital Tool Use Foster Critical Literacy”

October 12, 2014- 7:00 p.m.

Eastern time zone/New York/USA

 

Dr. Richard Beach, University of Minnesota, USA

Dr. Richard Beach, University of Minnesota, USA

 

Richard Beach is professor emeritus of English Education at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include literacy practices and identity construction, uses of digital literacies, particularly iPad app affordances, teaching secondary literature/writing, literacy practices and CCSS implementation. He has published widely and most of his books are accessible on his resource websites. He has spent researching on students’ responses to literature, particularly multicultural literature, students’ digital writing, uses or literacy tools and critical inquiry. As a member of the National Council of Teachers of English and the organization’s Media and Digital Literacies Collaborative, he also had explored teaching media and digital writing.

Access Dr. Beach’s books and resources as below.

media literacy

media literacy wiki

teaching digital writing

using apps for teaching

 

 Using Apps for Learning Across the Curriculum

 

Dr. Beach’s most recent publication is entitled Using Apps for Learning Across the Curriculum. This book offers both a theoretical framework for considering app affordances and practical ways to use apps to build students’ disciplinary literacies and to foster a wide range of literacy practices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

text

Another of Dr. Beach’s recent book is entitled Understanding and Creating Digital Text. This book provides secondary and college English language arts teachers with activities and classroom examples for using a range of different digital tools—blogs, wikis, websites, annotations, Twitter, mapping, forum discussions, etc.—to engage students in understanding and creating digital texts. It therefore integrates reading and writing instruction through goal-driven activities supported by uses and affordances of digital tools. Also, this book provides a framework for designing these activities that encourage students to define purpose and audience, make connections between digital texts and people, collaborate with others, employ alternative modes of communication and gain new perspectives, and constructing identities; practices that are linked to addressing the high school English Language Arts Common Core State Standards.

Selected Publications

Journal Articles

Beach, R. (2011). Issues in analyzing alignment of language arts Common Core Standards with state standards, Educational Researcher, 43(5), 179-182.

Beach, R., & Yussen, S. (2011). Practices of productive adult book clubs, Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 55(2), 121-131.

Beach, R., & Doerr-Stevens, C. (2011). Using Social Networking for Online Role-plays to Develop Students’ Argumentative Strategies, Journal of Educational Computing Research, 45(2), 165-181.

Beach, R., & Doerr-Stevens, C. (2009). Learning argument practices through online role-play: Toward a rhetoric of significance and transformation, 52(6), 460-468.

Beach, R. (2012). Research and policy: Can online learning communities foster professional development?, Language Arts, 89(4), 256-262.

Beach, R. (2012). Uses of digital tools and literacies in English Language Arts classroom, Research in the Schools, 19(1), 45-59.

Castek, J., & Beach, R. (2013). Using apps to support disciplinary learning and science learning. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 56(7), 544-554.

Doering, A., Beach, R. (2002). Preservice English teachers acquiring literacy practices through technology tools, Language Learning & Technology, 6(3), 127-146.

Doering, A., Beach, R., O’brien, D. (2007). Infusing multimodal tools and digital literacies into an English education program, English Education, 40(1), 41-60.

Doerr-Steven, C., Beach, R., Boeser, E. (2011). Using online role-play to promote collaborative argument and collective action, English Journal, 100(5), 33-39.

Galda, L., & Beach, R. (2001). Response to literature as cultural activity. Reading Research Quarterly, 36(1), 64-73.

Myers, J., & Beach, R. (2001). Hypermedia authoring as critical literacy. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literac, 44 (6), 538-546.

Newell, G. E., Beach, R., Smith, J., VanDerHeide, J.(2011). Teaching and learning argumentative reading and writing: A review of research, 46(3), 273-304.

Books

Beach, R., & Purves, A. C. (1972). Literature and the reader: Research on response to literature, reading interests, and the teaching of literature. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Beach, R. (1977). Writing about ourselves and others. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Beach, R., & Pearson, P. D. (Eds.). (1979). Perspectives on literacy. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Beach, R., & Bridwell, L. (Eds.). (1984). New directions in composition research. New York: Guilford Press.

Beach, R., & Hynds, S. (1989). Research on learning and teaching of literature: A bibliography. Albany, NY: Center for Research on the Teaching of Literature, SUNY Albany.

Beach, R., & Hynds, S. (Eds.). (1990).   Developing discourse practices in adolescence and adulthood. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Beach, R., & Marshall, J. (1991). Teaching literature in the secondary school. San Diego Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich.

Beach, R., Green, J., Kamil, M., & Shanahan, T. (Eds.). (1992). Multidisciplinary perspectives on literacy research. Urbana, IL: National Conference on Research in English/National Council of Teachers of English.

Beach, R. (1993). A teacher’s introduction to theories of response to literature.   Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Anson, C., & Beach, R. (1995). Journals in the classroom: Writing to learn. Norwood, MA: Christopher Gordon.

Beach, R., & Myers, J. (2001). Inquiry-based English instruction: Engaging students in life and literature. New York: Teachers College Press.

Beach, R., Green, J., Kamil, M., & Shanahan, T. (Eds.). (2005). Multidisciplinary perspectives on literacy research, 2nd ed. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Beach, R., Appleman, D., Hynds, S., Wilhelm, J. (2006). Teaching literature to adolescents. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Beach, R. (2007). Teachingmedialiteracy.com: A Web-based guide to links and activities. New York: Teachers College Press.

Beach, R., Thein, A., & Parks, D. (2008). High school students’ competing social worlds: Negotiating identities and allegiances through responding to multicultural literature. New York: Erlbaum.

Beach, R., Anson, C., Kastman-Breuch, L., Swiss, T. (2009).

Teaching writing using blogs, wikis, and other digital tools. Norwood, MA: Christopher Gordon.

Beach, R., Campano, G., Borgman, M., Edmiston, B. (2010). Literacy Tools in the Classroom: Teaching Through Critical Inquiry, Grades 5-12. New York: Teachers College Press.

Beach, R., Appleman, D., Hynds, S., Wilhelm, J. (2011). Teaching literature to adolescents, revised, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.

Beach, R., Heartling-Thein, M., & Webb, A. (2012). Exceeding the 6-12 English language arts Common Core Standards. New York: Routledge.

Beach, R., & O’Brien, D. (2012). Using iPad and iPhone Apps for Learning with Literacy Across the Curriculum. Apple iBookstore.

 Chapters in Books

Beach, R., & Bruce, B. C. (2002). Using digital tools to foster critical inquiry. In Donna E. Alvermann (Ed.), Adolescents and literacies in a digital world, (pp. 147-163). New York: Peter Lang.

Beach, R., O’Brien, D. (2013). Fostering student writing-to-learn through app affordances. In Kristine E. Pytash, Richard E. Ferdig, Timothy V. Rasinski (Ed.), Preparing teachers to teach writing using technology, (pp.71-82).

 

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